Anemia / Benign Hematology

Breast Cancer Oncology Specialists Summit NJ

Anemia Statistics

The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia is 2 percent in adult men, 9 to 12 percent in non-Hispanic white women, and nearly 20 percent in black and Mexican-American women. Nine percent of patients older than 65 years with iron deficiency anemia have a gastrointestinal cancer when evaluated. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force currently recommends screening for iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women but not in other groups. Routine iron supplementation is recommended for high-risk infants six to 12 months of age.

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide. It can cause reduced work capacity in adults1 and impact motor and mental development in children and adolescents. There is some evidence that iron deficiency without anemia affects cognition in adolescent girls and causes fatigue in adult women. IDA may affect visual and auditory functioning and is weakly associated with poor cognitive development in children.

Anemia Symptoms

The symptoms of anemia vary according to the type of anemia, the underlying cause, the severity and any underlying health problems, such as hemorrhaging, ulcers, menstrual problems, or cancer. Specific symptoms of those problems may be noticed first. The body also has a remarkable ability to compensate for early anemia. If your anemia is mild or has developed over a long period of time, you may not notice any symptoms.

Symptoms common to many types of anemia include the following: Easy fatigue and loss of energy, unusually rapid heart beat, particularly with exercise, shortness of breath and headache, particularly with exercise, difficulty concentrating, dizziness, pale skin, leg cramps, insomnia. People with an iron deficiency may experience these symptoms: A hunger for strange substances such as paper, ice, or dirt (a condition called pica), upward curvature of the nails, referred to as koilonychias, soreness of the mouth with cracks at the corners. Click here to review numerous treatment options.

Our NJ Cancer Center Oncology and Hematology Practitioners:

Maithili Rao, M.D., Ashish Khot, M.D., Charlesse Pondt, M.D., Joshua Strauss, M.D., Ashish Shah, D.O., Ramsey Asmar, M.D., Nikki Bajaj, MD, Jessica Taff, MD, Ved Desai, MD, Marlene Schmitz, APN, Edgar “Joed” LaChica, APN, Cherry Rudge, APN, Kari Sierant, APN, Jessica Surloff, PA, Jennifer Figueroa, PA

Our Anemia / Benign Hematology Practitioners can be located by referencing medical directories for: Anemia / Benign Hematology Oncology Doctors NJ and Anemia / Benign Oncologist NJ, Hematologist NJ Specialists in the Springfield, Summit, West Orange, Livingston, Morristown, Rockaway, Randolph, Hackettstown, Newton, Sparta and statewide areas.

Contact Us Today!

To find out more about our facilities and services contact one of our state-of-the-art offices.

SPRINGFIELD / SUMMIT
385 Morris Avenue, Suite 100
Springfield, NJ 07081

Business Hours:
Monday-Friday 8am-5pm
Saturday and Sunday Closed

WEST ORANGE / LIVINGSTON
741 Northfield Ave. Suite 203
West Orange, NJ 07052

Phone: 973.379.2111
Fax: 973.379.2807
Top Rated NJ Oncologist
& Hematologist Specialists

MORRISTOWN / RANDOLPH
Carol G. Simon Cancer Center
100 Madison Avenue 2nd Floor
Morristown, NJ 07960

HACKETTSTOWN / NEWTON
Hackettstown Medical Center
657 Willow Grove Street Suite 303
Hackettstown, NJ 07840